Maps: 1000 – 1225

Maps, 1000 – 1225 – Contents of this web page

Maps below include:

  • England in Stephen’s Reign
  • The Regions of France
  • Normandy
  • The Crusades – Outremer in 1140, 1190 and 1193
  • Royal Forests in England

England in the reign of Stephen

England in Stephen's Reign

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regions of France in medieval times

Solid shaded areas are the demesne land of the French crown, the Ile de France

Medieval France 1150 

Normandy

Normandy

 

 

The Crusades

Crusader Outremer 1100-1140

Crusader Outremer 1190

Crusader Outremer 1193

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Royal Forests in England, Thirteenth Century

Royal Forests 13C

18 thoughts on “Maps: 1000 – 1225

  1. Hi David,
    I live in Perth, Australia and have downloaded nearly all your podcasts (I confess that I skipped a few Saxon ones, sorry) to accompany me on my drive to, and from, work.
    I’ve loved all of them, and so I thought I’d drop you a line to tell you so.
    Tremendous work and highly educational. Your delivery and humour are terrific, too.
    Many thanks for making my summer so enjoyable.
    Please keep on trooping through the decades.
    Having said that, I think I’ll act as bookmaker and run a book of odds for the reign you pack it all in at.
    My money’s on you being sick of podcasting by about Edward VI. 🙂
    Many thanks again!!
    Julian Mould
    Univ of Western Australia

  2. Hi David,
    I have only recently found out about your podcasts so I have started at the first and going through them one at a time, including all the supplementary ones. Just finishing William the Conquer so I am still playing catch up but I wanted to thank you for the hard work and hours you have invested in this series so far, I had no interest in History until recently and knew woefully little of the Anglo Saxon period. Now however, you have brought the subject to life despite the names and complex relationships, marriages, disputes and conflicts.
    So, when you are in your shed podcasting away remember that you have a fascinated and grateful audience hanging on your every word. Thank you again.

  3. Hello David,
    I recently discovered your podcasts after hearing an interview with the one and only Mike Duncan after he completed his epic story of Rome. It was fantastic to be able to cruise straight into your Podcasts almost seemlessly picking up the story in our own islands. You are doing a great job and I would say that you are the British Mike Duncan. I have learnt an awful lot so far, having made it as far as the start of the Conflict between Stephen and Matilda. Keep up the good work, it’s excellent so far.
    Allen Clarke
    Southampton
    England

  4. I discovered your podcasts a few months ago and have been listening while driving. I am looking forward to listening to #39-41 tomorrow. Very enjoyable. Thanks for your humor, many interesting facts and stories, and your synthesis! I’ve also wanted to ask you about any agricultural or technological innovations that had big societal impacts during the periods you’ve been covering, but don’t know if that is already covered in podcasts that I haven’t yet heard. thanks again!

  5. I have only recently come across your excellent podcasts and have already finished 43. Many more to go to catch up. I am enjoying them immensely. I must confess to getting a bit lost in the anarchy period, but perhaps that is justifiable! Keep up the great work.

  6. You spoke of audio problems in one of your podcasts. Overall I find the sound quality clear and crisp. Any “booming” can be reduced by placing some sound absorbing foam in a curve behind and to the sides of the microphone. This can be quite close, so you don’t need much of it.
    I really like your work, which I only discovered a few weeks ago. Thanks.
    Paul

  7. Faced with a long drive down to Switzerland a couple of weeks ago I went looking for something to pass the miles with and downloaded your podcasts on a whim. What a lucky accident. The Anglo-Saxon period has always been my favourite but so far I have always been left dissatisfied with the broad general statements many historians use to cover events. These podcasts have satisfied my slightly OCD need for a bit more detail than ‘and then the Danes invaded’! Thankyou very much and keep up the good work….even if I am slightly struggling with all the Fitzes 🙂
    Dave

  8. Hi Paul – OK, that sounds like a good tip! My (physicist) brother suggested that I cover the walls of my shed in egg boxes. I’m sure this would have improved the sound quality, but was not hte most practical suggestion! Yours sounds much more practical.
    Hi Dave – delighted to have kept you company all the way down to Switzerland. I love the AS period too; I rather wish I could do them again though – I feel I’ve learnt quite a lot about podcasting since.
    Good luck with the Fitzes.
    David

  9. Hi David
    I am travelling Calais Rouen Chartres Amboise and back this summer with time to spare en route. My history with you has reached Stephen and should be into the 100 years war by then. Can you recommend a or several “stop offs” to breathe in some places, to enhance the story.
    You really strike a good note! Thanks.
    Brian

  10. Hi David. Carry on the good work, your history podcasts are great for listening to while at the gym.

  11. Hi David,
    Have recently started listening to your podcast (love it!), and have quite a bit of catching up to do (only on #46). I confess this is the first time I have visited the treasure trove that is your website. Thanks for posting all this. I am trying to find a map of the (forgive the spelling) Vexan? Vechsan? That area next to Normandy that every Norman king wants to have… but having trouble finding it. Also, due to my deplorable spelling (apparently) googling the term isn’t helping… any assistance much appreciated! Keep up the good work! Sincerely,

  12. I recently found your podcast. I love it! Great delivery and an interesting topic. Thanks for all the work you put into it.

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